Australia and Egypt celebrate together

December 31, 2010

This year Australia and Egypt are celebrating 60 years of diplomatic relations between our two countries. To mark this occasion, Mr. Kevin Rudd, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Commonwealth of Australia traveled to Cairo to meet with several members of the Egyptian government, including His Excellency President Hosni Mubarak.This year Australia and Egypt are celebrating 60 years of diplomatic relations between our two countries. To mark this occasion, Mr. Kevin Rudd, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Commonwealth of Australia traveled to Cairo to meet with several members of the Egyptian government, including His Excellency President Hosni Mubarak.

Dr. Hawass presents Mr. Kevin Rudd, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Australia, with a copy of his book on Tutankhamun. The Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs exhibit will travel to Melbourne, Australia in April 2011. (Photo: Meghan E. Strong)

Dr. Hawass presents Mr. Kevin Rudd, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Australia, with a copy of his book on Tutankhamun. The Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs exhibit will travel to Melbourne, Australia in April 2011. (Photo: Meghan E. Strong)

In the beginning of December the Australian Embassy hosted a wonderful reception where I met with Mr. Rudd. We had the opportunity to discuss the exhibition of King Tutankhamun, which will travel to Melbourne in April 2011.  This exhibition, Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, will be on display in New York City until January 17, 2011. I plan on visiting Australia while the exhibition is in Melbourne and I look forward to meeting with Mr. Rudd again and visiting his country.

 
During the reception in celebration of Australia and Egypt’s history together, Mr. Rudd gave a wonderful speech highlighting the economic and diplomatic relations between our two countries, but also the cultural links between Australians and Egyptians. Mr. Rudd noted the contribution to all aspects of In the beginning of December the Australian Embassy hosted a wonderful reception where I met with Mr. Rudd. We had the opportunity to discuss the exhibition of King Tutankhamun, which will travel to Melbourne in April 2011.  This exhibition, Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, will be on display in New York City until January 17, 2011. I plan on visiting Australia while the exhibition is in Melbourne and I look forward to meeting with Mr. Rudd again and visiting his country.
Mr. Rudd gives Dr. Hawass an Australian bush hat. (Photo: Meghan E. Strong)

Mr. Rudd gives Dr. Hawass an Australian bush hat. (Photo: Meghan E. Strong)

 
During the reception in celebration of Australia and Egypt’s history together, Mr. Rudd gave a wonderful speech highlighting the economic and diplomatic relations between our two countries, but also the cultural links between Australians and Egyptians. Mr. Rudd noted the contribution to all aspects of Australian society made by the approximately 33,000 Egyptian-Australians and tens of thousands more with Egyptian ancestry. Mr Aboul Gheit, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Egypt, noted that more than 60,000 Australians visit Egypt each year – a significant number given the geographical distance between both countries. I was also very glad that Mr. Rudd pointed out Egypt’s importance in negotiating peace in the Middle East and I hope that 2011 will be the year that all nations of the Middle East will come together in peaceful relations with one another.I was very glad to be a part of this occasion and I hope that Australia and Egypt will be able to celebrate many more years of friendship and cooperation in the future.  

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Reference: drhawass.com
Posted by: Shaimaa Ahmed

Statuary fragments uncovered in Luxor

December 17, 2010

Two red granite statuary fragments of King Amenhotep III were unearthed this week at Amenhotep III’s (1410 – 1372 BC) mortuary temple on the west bank of Luxor.

Two red granite statuary fragments found at the site of Amenhotep III's mortuary temple on the west bank of Luxor (Photo: SCA)

Two red granite statuary fragments found at the site of Amenhotep III's mortuary temple on the west bank of Luxor (Photo: SCA)

Minister of Culture, Farouk Hosny announced that these objects were found during a routine excavation carried out by an Egyptian team on the northern side of the temple. The team has been working to uncover the ruins of the funerary complex, which was once the largest temple in ancient Egypt.Unfortunately, during the Late Period, the temple was destroyed and its blocks were reused in the construction of other temples. Dr. Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), explained that the first newly discovered artifact is a 2.73m tall head of the god Hapi. Hapi was one of the four sons of Horus and is depicted with a baboon face. The second object is a fragment of a larger statue of King Amehotep III, which features two legs that measure 30cm tall. Excavation is now focused on unearthing the rest of these statuary fragments. Due to the large number of statuary found in this area, Hawass believes that the northern side of the temple may have served as a burial spot for broken and damaged statues. Because the statuary were ritually significant they could not be destroyed, instead Hawass believes that the ancient Egyptians gathered the fallen statues and buried them in a cache beside temple.

Abdel Ghaffar Wagdi, supervisor of the excavation team, said that excavators are working now on uncovering more statues from the agricultural land surrounding Amenhotep III’s mortuary temple. In the past two archaeological seasons five double statues of King Amenhotep III accompanied by the deities: Re-Horakhti, Khepri, Horus, and Hapi have been found.

Memphis Tours Egypt Since 1955
Posted By: Shaimaa ahmed
Reference: drhawass.com

From Egypt With Love…

April 10, 2010

Egypt

Egypt can be the perfect place for couples to rekindle their romantic spark, or just keep the fires burning hot in some of the most romantic spots in the world. That is, if you know where to look. Egypt Today has scoured the nation in search of the best destinations to partake in candle-lit dinners, walks on the beach and oasis spa treatments.

Despite Cairo’s hectic pace, the capital has several nooks and crannies where couples can steal a quiet moment alone to watching the sun set over the Nile. There are few places in the city where you’ll find greenery, but Al-Azhar Park is the best of them. The parkis a wonderful escape from Cairo’s urban stress. Atop the park’s main hill is an ideal spot for a picnic and offers a great view of the Citadel. For those who would rather enjoy finer fare, two cafés on-site offer a variety of salads, main courses, coffees and Arab sweets. One of the cafés overlooks a small lake, while the other has a garden vista.

Nothing says amour in Cairo like a felucca along the Nile at sunset. Though there are boats, such as the Grand Hyatt’s Marquise, that offer dinner and a belly dancing show, there is a certain je ne sais quoi about hiring your own private love boat for an hour.

Memories by the Mediterranean

The best part of Alexandria is its long stretch of beaches, from Qait Bay Fortress all the way to Montazah. Start your day with breakfast (or brunch) at the Helnan Palestine Hotel inside Montazah Gardens, where you can enjoy freshly-made croissants and a gorgeous view of the beach. If you own a cabin in Montazah, take advantage of it; beaches like Nefertiti and Cleopatra make intimate and discreet picnic spots.

For lunch and dinner dates, walk along the Eastern Harbor’s Corniche to the area around Qait Bay Fortress. The Greek Club overlooking the harbor and fortress is bound to delight your partner, as is the Chinese restaurant on the rooftop of the Sofitel Cecil Hotel, with its sweeping view of the entire harbor.

The Breathtaking Red Sea

Wherever there’s a beach, there’s bound to be a romantic spot, but settle only for the best. The Red Sea’s top two favorites are El-Gouna and Marsa Alam. El-Gouna is the spot to see and be seen for both couples and singles alike. Lazing by the beach is an El-Gouna staple, but couples looking for an extra thrill can take wake-boarding or kite-surfing classes together.

Come nightfall, a candlelight dinner at the French restaurant Bleu overlooking the marina is a must. Following dinner, couples can take a midnight stroll by the boats or dance the night away at Tabasco. The club is popular, but not too crowded, so you can enjoy dancing with your date without too much intrusion.

If you’re having trouble sealing the deal with a special someone, Marsa Alam is the perfect place to sweep them off their feet. During the day, go snorkeling with the dolphins at Samadai Reef, better known as the Dolphin House. Follow it up with a picnic on the coast, where oftentimes you can have a whole beach to yourself.

As the moon rises, cuddle up in any of the cafes on the beach (literally, on the beach), and watch the stars emerge while sipping freshly brewed tea from the mountains. Marsa Alam has several posh resorts along the coast like Kahramana Beach Resort, or simpler and more environmentally friendly huts, tents and stone chalets, such as Ecolodge Shagara. For a top of the line Marsa Alam experience, stay in Port Ghalib, a luxurious resort community with five-star hotels and a shopping street, as well as a lagoon and marina.

Desert Dreaming

Are you and your significant other having trouble getting some time to yourselves? There’s nowhere more isolated than a oasis in the middle of the Western Desert. Siwa’s easygoing people, delicate organic cuisine and accommodations seemingly designed with the romantic desert getaway in mind make the oasis an undiscovered gem for couples.A quick romantic evening that doesn’t take much planning is a Bedouin dinner amid the dunes. Most hotels offer forays into the sand or can recommend a good guide with an off-road vehicle.

There are also several springs to visit in the area, such as Cleopatra’s Bath, Fatnas Spring and Bir Wahed lake, where couples can have a picnic and swim.

Bahareyya, Farafra, and Al-Dakhla oases also offer worthwhile excursions for adventurous couples and are a good starting point for deep desert tours. From Bahareyya and Farafra, arrange a tour of the Black and White deserts, coupled with nights under the stars in a Bedouin camp. Private or group tours can be arranged in the towns or through your hotel. But before you go, spend a lazy day of reading and eating dates underneath palm trees in any one of the tiny hotels in the oasis towns and get a real feel for life in a small village out in the middle of the desert.

Sinai
Sharm El-Sheikh is a no-brainer for couples, with its long stretches of beach, resorts and exclusive private yachts for rent. But for a more intimate experience, try Ras Shitan, about 15 kilometers from Nuweiba. Its quiet beaches and pristine desert landscape can’t be beat.

If camps aren’t your thing, but you still want to avoid Sharm’s resort-laden coast, try Dahab. Known for its great diving, Dahab’s hotels and hostels near the Eel Garden are great places to spend quality time with your loved one while sipping a fruit shake in the sun.

Climbing Mount Sinai during the night to see the sunrise is the way most people do St. Catherine. Sunrise is the traditional goal of the climb, and it is definitely worth seeing, but you will be sharing the experience with a few hundred other dawn devotees. For a more intimate experience, make the hike in the afternoon so you can sit in silence and watch the rays of the setting sun paint the surrounding mountains in dramatic reds and oranges.

Upper Egypt

In the capital, feluccas and dinner cruises reign on the river, but for a proper multi-day cruise, Upper Egypt is the place to be. Nile cruises start from either Aswan or Luxor and range from three to seven days, depending on direction and number of stops. These floating hotels take care of all the planning for you, from transportation and tickets to the antiquities sites along the way to full board meals and evening entertainment programs.

The one drawback to a Nile cruise is its popularity. There are tens of cruise ships en route at any given time, except when the Esna locks are closed for maintenance in June and December, so the river gets awfully crowded near the tourist sites. A more isolated option is the Lake Nasser cruise: there are less than 10 boats authorized to operate on the world’s largest man-made lake. In addition to visiting a number of little-known antiquities sites, you and your companion can sip mocktails and clink glasses as you cross the Tropic of Cancer.

Known as one of the most beautiful places in the country, Aswan is a treat for couples with a yen for exploring. It’s a wonderful place to enjoy sunrises and sunsets while indulging with your evening or morning ahwa. One of the most picturesque corners of the country is Philae Island, with the Greco-Roman temples amid the flowering landscape.

After taking in the local ruins, particularly on Elephantine Island, check out the Sharia Al-Souq. Behind conventional shops and touristy peddlers are winding alleys with market fare accented by the city’s Nubian roots. Off the beaten path is Sculpture Park, home to world-renowned works from international sculptors. The park, housing the art created during Aswan’s annual sculpture symposium, is on the way to the Philae Island boat dock, so arrange transportation in advance. et et

Refernce: Egypt Today.

Excavations in the Valley of the Kings.

March 28, 2010

One of the most famous sites in Egypt has always been the Valley of the Kings, which has revealed to us such wonders as the tomb of Tutankhamun. However, all of the major discoveries of the past were made by foreign archaeologists. I was determined that Egyptian archaeologists should become part of the process of excavation and discovery, so in November 2007, the first all-Egyptian team to ever work in the Valley began excavating the area behind the tomb of Merenptah.

In the cliffs behind the tomb we discovered channels that the ancient Egyptians dug to redirect the “tears of the gods,” the flood, in order to preserve the tombs. In the course of our excavations, we recorded many new graffiti in the Valley and found many ostraca, which are pieces of limestone or pottery with drawings and inscriptions. The inscriptions found were very interesting, including a picture of an old lady, the cartouche of Ramses II and many descriptions and other things.

The second site we excavated was the area in front of the tomb of Tutankhamun, KV 62. Many people have been looking for a new tomb in the Valley, especially since the discovery of KV 63 in 2005. Nicholas Reeves had conducted radar survey and the results showed a crack in the mountain, which he said could indicate a tunnel in the mountain that could end in a burial chamber. He thought that KV 64 would be located in front of the tomb of Tutankhamun. However, as we know from a study of the geology of the Valley of the Kings, there are many cracks in the mountain, and when we excavated, we found nothing. Another scholar, Lyla Brock, indicated that a “KV C” would be found near the antiquities office. We demolished the antiquities office and investigated that area and the area in front of Tutankhamun’s tomb, but we found no evidence of any tomb.

Another of our excavation projects in the Valley rediscovered the workmen’s huts found by Howard Carter. We excavated them and found that they were huts where the workmen lived temporarily while they were constructing tombs in the Valley, and they were reused in Dynasty 19 as storage magazines. The most important work that we have done in the Valley of the Kings is to make a study of the levels in the Valley from Dynasty 18 to 20 for the first time.

We are also excavating in the Valley of the Monkeys, which is right next to the Valley of the Kings. Our finds there included many ostraca and pottery from the time of Amenhotep III in front of his tomb. The most important things we found in the Valley of the Monkeys are four foundation deposits, each containing pottery, weapons, tools, animal bones and other artifacts. Kent Weeks has published that foundation deposits were not placed before the tomb was built, as they were with temple deposits, but were deposited after the construction. If we study all of the tomb foundation deposits in the Valley of the Kings, we find that some tombs have five deposits while others have four. Therefore, the discovery of four foundation deposits near each other in the Valley of the Monkeys indicates that there could be a tomb nearby, and we hope to find it. I would be very happy if it is the tomb of Ankhesenamun, the wife of Tutankhamun, who married King Ay after Tut’s death. Another exciting possibility is the tomb of Queen Tiye, the wife of Amenhotep III, whose mummy we have recently identified. Both of these queens would be likely to be buried in the Valley of the Monkeys, near the tombs of their husbands. We continue our excavations in this area in the hopes of revealing the secrets of this fascinating place.

Reference :

http://www.drhawass.com/blog/excavations-valley-kings

Posted by : Memphis Tours.


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